2011 Revisions of the Prayers of MASS

It is now almost THREE YEARS since we began using the newly translated prayers of the Mass (Advent, 2011).   Use this page to review.

For a presentation on the changes in the Prayers of the People at Mass Click here for a presentation: Changes in the Prayers of the People at Mass

The Catholic Church throughout the English speaking world has received and implemented a new translation of the Roman Missal (the prayers prayed at Mass) This new translation of the Prayers we pray at Mass has provided the opportunity for every parish of the Diocese of Helena and every parishioner to revisit and renew the spirit of the liturgy envisioned by the Second Vatican Council’s Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy. (Click on the RED icon to go directly to the National Conference of Catholic Bishops’ Committee on Divine Worship for an overview of the Third Edition of the Roman Missal.)

Bishop Thomas calls the Church in the Diocese of Helena to embrace this opportunity:
“Almost fifty years ago the Second Vatican Council embraced a vision rooted in the deep and rich tradition of the Church and set out on the irrevocable path of a restored and renewed vision of the liturgy in which the full, conscious and active participation of all is “the aim to be considered before all else.” (CSL #14) We have learned, grieved, celebrated, changed our heart, and discovered anew the abiding presence of Christ in our life, church, worship, and world during these years. The strong foundation we have received, the rich experience of our work of worship enables us to continue that vision with a renewed spirit and enflamed hope. The glow of that vision again sends us forth to ‘love and serve the Lord’ keenly and humbly aware that we are “walking in the footsteps of those who have gone before us,” who like us have hoped to live and act in the memory of Christ. And so we reflect on the mystery ‘in which we show forth the paschal sacrifice of Christ entrusted to us.’ Liturgical catechesis always begins and ends with the experience, the story, the thanksgiving, the memory, the communion, and the mission. What have we done? What do we do? What must we yet do in memory of Christ, the one whose life, death and resurrection we have entered?”
Montana Catholic, November 19, 2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

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